Acting

Eleventy-Eight Awesome Audition Tips – Part Four

Part One talked a bit about my acting “career” and told you I was auditioning for the first time in about three or four years.

Part Two talked about material choice, and how I came to choose the material I was going to use.

Part Three shared some of my best tips for auditions.

Here’s Part Four, wherein I reveal how the actual audition went.

If I was grading myself I’d give me a B-.

Tragedies

  • My biggest foible was that they were running a bit behind and I let my over-active imagination do all the things it loves to do to sabotage me. I worked myself up so much that I was pretty nervous by the time I got into the room. There’s nothing wrong with being nervous at an audition. An audition is an unnatural situation and nervousness is expected. The key is to manage that nervousness and channel it into a positive energy. I really failed at this. I just just plain nervous.
  • When I brought my sheet music to the accompanist he was already familiar with the song. This was great. But I neglected to tell him that I was going to do something a bit different with the song and wanted it a bit slower and straighter. He played way too brightly for what I was going for (totally my fault) and I got frustrated, dropped a couple of words, and really didn’t sing that well.
  • I played my monologue way too “generally” – I had set up a specific place for my imaginary scene partner but I forgot about him halfway through the piece. I did well enough and they laughed in the right places, but I could have done much better.
  • I might’ve insulted the AD. I said something about the company that I think she took as an insult, but I really meant nothing of the sort. Oops.

Triumphs

  • I was nice to everybody I encountered. (see part three) I’m Canadian. I can’t help it.
  • Apart from the aforementioned foot-in-mouth foible I think I established a pretty good rapport with the two ADs and accompanist. We knew and have worked with enough people in common that there was lots to talk about.
  • They gave me a callback appointment while I was there and so they must’ve seen something worth seeing again. It’s kind of a generic callback, though, not for any specific role or show.

What’s Next?

I’ll be going to a callback in a few weeks. If there’s anything interesting to report you’ll hear it here first!

About the author

Craig Mason