Production

Spread the Love: Floating on a Don’t Care Cloud

Welcome to Spread the Love!

This week Lindsay spoke with the cast at Park Street Collegiate Institute about their production of Floating on a Don’t Care Cloud.

Transcript

Welcome to Spread the Love!

We are here at Park Street Collegiate Institute in Orillia and we’re going to see a production of one of my plays, Floating on a Don’t Care Cloud, and that is the topic of Spread the Love this week.

Issue plays are something which are really, really important in our catalogue. They are something that come up again and again, and it’s really important that we write issue plays that don’t suck. So, that’s what I really like about Floating on a Don’t Care Cloud, that’s why it’s really important to me, and I can’t wait to see the show. Let’s go!
Girl: I scrub, and scrub, and scrub until, until my fingers are bleeding and my heart is beating so fast I have to hold on to the edge. If I don’t hold on, I’ll break apart.

Lindsay: Why did you choose the play?

Leanna: I fell in love with the play after reading a few and I was sitting in the staff room. I was laying on the couch and I had my feet up. I read it and I could not stop turning the pages and then I knew.

Lindsay: Ah. So, obviously that’s a good sign.

Leanna: A good sign.

Lindsay: And now that you have it up, do you still have the same…?

Leanna: I do. And every time I see it, there’s something new and something more exciting that I would do.

Girl 1: It has a good message but, at the same time, it’s kind of fantastical so it kind of keeps your attention. It’s not just straight boring.

Lindsay: I get you.

Girl 2: Yeah, so it’s not just like, “Don’t try pot!”

Girl 3: I like that you bring in stuff that’s more serious than pot. First of all, like meth. A lot of kids aren’t aware of methamphetamine.

Lindsay: Or that the people who use it are exactly like Mya – they’re top of their class and they’re using it to get ahead.

…questions because there has to the question of not involving, it’s not my job, it’s not my job to tell a twelve-year-old or a fifteen-year-old or a twenty-year-old or a thirty-year-old, you know, “Don’t do this!” or, “You shouldn’t do that.” But you have to be the one who answers the question for yourself. So, how wonderful that, you know, to go to a feeder schooland some twelve-year-old comes out, “Oh! Oh, I’m not alone. This happens. This happens everywhere.”

Girl: I have to pull back from the edge, the edge, the edge. If I don’t, I’ll break apart. I’ll break. I’ll break.

About the author

Craig Mason