Shakespeare has writer’s block. Nothing inspires him. The best he can come up with is “Now is the winter of our irritation!” Postcards from Shakespeare by Allison Williams is so much more than your typical Shakespeare spoof.

Theatrefolk - The Drama Teacher Resource Company

Spread the Love: No Horse Town by Lindsay Price

This week we spread the love for No Horse Town by Lindsay Price. Recorded live in the Old West.

Transcript

Welcome to this week’s Spread the Love. We are here in Frontierland, which is a great place to talk about this week’s play: No Horse Town. No Horse Town takes place in a very small town. The small town of Haywood. Haywood is a very special place. It’s one of those small towns where everybody knows their neighbour, everybody says hi. In fact, it is so small that there are no streets in Haywood. It’s a no car, no street, no horse town.

And when the young boys in Haywood get to a certain age, the thing that they do, the dangerous thing they do to prove they’re a man is go to the edge of town and cross the street.

Craig, what do you love about No Horse Town?

What I love about No Horse Town is that it’s really unique in that it’s a comedy that you don’t play for laughs. It’s strongly, strongly stylistic and I think people might get confused a bit when they first pick up the script. But it’s one of those plays, that if you just have the faith in it, just play it completely straight, completely honest, then you’re gonna get those laughs. If you play for laughs, you’re not gonna get laughs, if you don’t play for laughs, you’re gonna get laughs, and that’s what’s really neat about this piece.

Lindsay, what do you love about No Horse Town?

Well, shoot. What I love about No Horse Town is the sound of it. This play is written specifically for sound. The sound of the dialogue, the sound of the accents, the use of words, the dialect, the slang. If you are a person who loves playing with sound, the aural quality of a script, you’re gonna die for this play. It’s all sound, the intricacies of dialogue, and how much sound affects character, how much sound affects story, and there are a couple of twists and turns in there that are specifically in the structure, in the sound of the play. So I’m gonna say tip to you buckaroo. And that’s it for spread the love.

Lindsay, I think we’re not being completely honest with the viewers.

We’re not? Oh no! Why aren’t we being completely honest?

Because I have found evidence of a horse. Lookit – there’s hoof prints right there.

Related Articles

Spread the Love: Agatha Rex – adapted by Lindsay Price from Antigone
Spread the Love: Agatha Rex – adapted by Lindsay Price from Antigone
Spread the Love: Body Body
Spread the Love: Body Body
Spread the Love: Alice
Spread the Love: Alice

Enjoy a Front Row Seat to Our Newsletter!

Subscribe for our exciting updates, insights, teaching resources, and new script releases. Plus, sign up now and get 4 plays and 2 lesson plans for FREE!

Theatrefolk - The Drama Teacher Resource Company
Theatrefolk is the Drama Teacher Resource Company. We are your one stop shop for Plays, Resources, and Curriculum Support - all specifically designed for High School and Middle School drama teachers.
Follow Us!
Drama Teacher Academy
Copyright © 1995-2024