Acting Production

Theatrefolk Featured Play – To Kill A Mocking Birdie by Clint Snyder

To Kill A Mocking Birdie
Written by Lindsay Price

Welcome to our Featured Play Spotlight. If you’re a fan of the classics but have wondered it would be like to tell the story through the lens of the absurd, you’ll love To Kill A Mocking Birdie by Clint Snyder.

Birdie would like you to meet her parents: a goldfish and a moldy piece of bread. Don’t mind the yelling, she didn’t get a pony as a child. And she certainly didn’t burn down an owl farm.

But she’s willing to feed you. And there may be egg rolls and chocolate cake! That is, if Carol the ex-maid brings it and doesn’t hold a grudge against Birdie for being fired. You may also meet What, When, Alexa (who’s hiding in the bathroom) and Birdie’s sister Scoot, who thinks she’s a glazed Virginia Ham.

It’s a perfectly crazy dinner party. Consider this your invitation.

Why did we publish this play?
This play is perfectly crazy. But there’s no wink to the audience, it’s a great example of characters committing to the world of the play. A fantastic world where your parents are a goldfish and a moldy piece of bread. You have students who don’t want to do kitchen sink dramas. You have students who don’t want to fit into boxes. Give them this play to show them how far they can go.

Let’s hear from the author!

1. Why did you write this play?
I wrote this play because To Kill a Mocking Bird always really spoke to me as a child, but I wanted to retell some of the themes through a lens of my own brand of bizarre dark humor.

2. Describe the theme in one or two sentences.
A child throws a dinner party to draw attention to her upbringing and the strange effects it has had on her psyche in hopes it will bring some peace.

3. What’s the most important visual for you in this play?
Anytime they are treating the piece of toast and goldfish like people.

4. If you could give one piece of advice for those producing the play, what would it be?
Have fun with it. Don’t be afraid to let yourself lose and give into the absurdity of the themes.

5. Why is this play great for student performers?
It gives the students a chance to relate to themes that affect them and bring the humor to life. The comedy keeps it engaging, while the characters are interesting enough to make it a good opportunity to teach character development.


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About the author

Lindsay Price