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Part of the Theatre History Curriculum

Unit 2: Greek & Roman Origins

Created by Drama Teacher Academy

For Ancient Greece, we will examine the ritual origins of tragedy and the Festival of Dionysus. We will explore the theatre conventions of the day including the amphitheatre, the use of masks, costumes, and other theatrical devices. Finally, we will introduce the main playwrights and their key plays. Then we will take a short look at Roman theatre with their wholesale appropriation of Greek culture.

Standards Addressed

Overview
The overview lays out the structure of the unit, including essential questions, time management tips, and reference to SEL, diversity, and distance learning resources.
Additional Attachments
1: Set the Stage for Greek Theatre Origins
In this lesson, students will be introduced to the Ancient Greek era. They will demonstrate their mythical knowledge through a mythology-specific game of Jeopardy! Finally, students will complete a research project on the sociopolitical and cultural background of the era.
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2: Origins of Ancient Greek Theatre
In this lesson, students will be introduced to Ancient Greek theatre festivals and then apply what they’ve learned by creating their own City Dionysia Festival.
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3: Theatre Conventions
In this lesson, students will be introduced to the conventions of Ancient Greek theatre and then complete a compare and contrast activity.
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4: Plays and Playwrights
In this lesson, students will be introduced to the plays and playwrights of Ancient Greek theatre. They will create their own hero’s downfall, take on a choral reading, examine Aristotle’s elements of drama, and read a monologue from Antigone.
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5: Roman Theatre and Unit Wrap-up
In this lesson, we will move on to the Roman theatre, which mainly shows how Greek theatre was adapted by the Romans.
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6: Culminating Activity
There is a lot in this unit, so perhaps you’ll just want to end with the quiz and reflection. However, if you want a performance activity to end the unit, consider this Greek monologue activity.
Attachments

Standards Addressed

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