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Part of the Middle School Curriculum

Unit Four: Intro to Scripted Scenes

Created by Lindsay Johnson

Students will be introduced to the most basic of scripts: the contentless/open scene script. They will use their knowledge of character/relationships, setting, objective, and tactics to add content to a contentless scene. Students will also learn the basics of set design and blocking, and will begin using voice expression to communicate clearer characters. The unit culminates in a performance assessment in which students will work in pairs to add content to and perform a contentless scene.

Standards Addressed

Overview
The overview lays out the structure for the 9-lesson unit, including assessment tools, key vocabulary, and learning target focus.
Additional Attachments
1: Intro to Scripts
In this introductory lesson, students will be able to define “script” and “dialogue.” They will begin to brainstorm characters/relationships, setting, and conflicts to add content to a contentless scene that they will work on for the rest of the unit. Students will use a variety of methods they’ve learned in the previous unit to communicate meaning: setting, pantomime, relationship clues, objectives, stakes, and tactics.
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2: Contentless Scene Brainstorm
Students will be able to brainstorm fitting characters, setting, and conflict for a contentless scene. Students will use a variety of methods they’ve learned in the previous unit to communicate meaning: setting, pantomime, relationship clues, objectives, stakes, and tactics.
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3: Contentless Scene Content Peer Review
In this lesson, students will perform for peers and give and receive feedback on the Scene Details Rubric. Students will be using a variety of methods they’ve learned in the previous unit to communicate meaning in a contentless scene: setting, pantomime, relationship clues, objectives, stakes, and tactics.
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4: Intro to Set and Stage Notes
In this lesson, students will learn the terminology needed to identify different parts of the stage and to create a set design that uses levels in an effective and appealing way. Students create a basic kitchen set design for a kitchen set design that applies their new knowledge of stage parts, levels and scenery.
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5: Intro to Blocking
In this lesson, students will decide how best to include movement in their scene to help an audience understand what is happening in the scene. Students will complete a set design for their partner scene and add 3+ blocking notes to their scripts. Students will also take a Stage Directions Mini-Quiz to demonstrate their understanding of stage directions/basic blocking notes.
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6: Open Body and Blocking Review
In this lesson, students will review the “open body” element of projection. Using this technique, students will make it easier for audiences to see and understand their actions in the scene.
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7: Intro to Voice Expression
In this lesson, students will focus on how voice can be used to communicate character as well as to make the dialogue in the scene easily accessible to an audience. Students will give and receive feedback on their vocal clarity and expression in performance.
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8: Final Scene Rehearsal
Students will review the various techniques we’ve explored this unit (voice, movement, set design, projection, etc.) to convey meaning in a contentless scene. They will continue to work on their scenes and complete a Rehearsal Checklist.
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9: Scene Performance Assessment
Students will review the various techniques we’ve explored this unit (voice, movement, set design, projection, etc.) to convey meaning in a contentless scene. Students will perform their final partner scene for assessment in front of the class. They will also completed an audience feedback sheet where they give their peers feedback on Rubric skills.
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Standards Addressed

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