Acting Production

Theatrefolk’s Top 10: Plays for Beginning Actors

plays for beginning actors
Written by Lindsay Price

Time for a Tfolk Top Ten Plays For…

Beginning Actors. Everybody has to start somewhere. Every drama student has to be in their first play. So here’s 10 to choose from! Every one of these scripts is a great place to start and a great first play for your beginning actors.

Click the link and you’ll be taken to the webpage for each play. There you’ll get the details and read sample pages.

All the best with your search!


Circus Olympus
A gleeful celebration of greek myth with excellent large cast expansion and parts for all abilities. Circus elements are optional and are suggested for each myth. Start here to introduce your students not only to greek myths but unique characters that are well within their wheelhouse.

Rainbows vs Bunnies: Annihilation
Aaron is failing history. Worse than than he’s been draw into the epic battle between rainbows and bunnies. For centuries rainbows and bunnies have been locked into a bitter rivalry to make people happy. Easy to stage and costume so all your beginning actors have to focus on is the characters. Yes your students can play rainbows…. And bunnies.

ths phne 2.0: the next generation
Vignette plays are perfect for beginning actors. These plays are compiled of short scenes on a theme, so everyone can get their scene just right. What’s the theme? Communication has come a long way, baby. Are you 21st century savvy?

We Open Tomorrow Night?!
We Open Tomorrow Night?! is a scripted talent show where you are the stars. Each production can insert their own acts (dance, comedy, singing – the choice is yours) for an hilarious and entertaining evening for all. This type of script makes for a great transition to scripted stage work for beginning actors.

Much Ado About High School
Don’t just introduce your students to acting, throw in some Shakespeare too! What if Much Ado About Nothing took place at a high school dance? Mayhem ensues at Much Ado High School. Student Council president Don Pedro schemes to set up new student Claudio with Hero. Hero schemes to set up Beatrice with Benedick. And Don John schemes to mess up everything! An enjoyable introduction to this Shakespearean tale with lightning-fast pace, hilarious characters, and witty dialogue.

Letters
Readers Theatre is one way to introduce beginning actors to the stage. They have to bring a character to life, but they don’t need to worry about memorization or blocking. For many wars, letters home were the only form of communication between soldiers and their loved ones. Letters is thought-provoking and character-driven. It’s not hard to vizualize these characters reaching out with pen and paper.

Anne-Arky
One of the best ways to get beginning actors started is to give them characters their own age. In Anne-arky, a high school drama club prepares for opening night. Things start out normally but anarchy quickly ensues. Wigs fall off, ankles are sprained, and the stage manager sets fire to the prompt script.

The Fried Kobassa
Inspector Kapusta will leave no stone unturned to find the camp cook’s missing kobassa. Okay, maybe he’ll leave a couple of stones unturned. Okay, maybe he’s a pretty bad detective but that just makes the play all the more hilarious. A light-hearted romp with the funniest of all the red meats at its centre: FRIED KOBASSA!

Hairball
Another vignette play with a topic every person, let alone every student, can relate to – hair. Good hair makes your day. Bad hair gets you dumped.Good hair gets you to the prom. Bad hair makes you look like an eggplant. Good hair means you’re popular. Bad hair means hat head for the rest of your life.

Christmas in July
This collection of two one acts give beginning actors something smaller to work on. Lots of small parts where students put their best foot forward. In Christmas in July the calendar gets all mixed up so the holidays are not where they’re supposed to be. In What do you do when the Elves have the flu, Christmas could come to an screeching halt with elves out of commission with Elven Flu.


Planning on performing one of these or another Theatrefolk play? Let us know all about it with pictures and highlights – we might even feature you on our site! Click here to submit your story.

About the author

Lindsay Price