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Mock Audition

Created by Lindsay Price

In this Mock Audition Unit, students will start by discussing the audition process. They will make connections between their personal views and the process. Students will then apply the steps of auditioning from putting together a resume, to choosing a piece based on provided information, to audition etiquette, to the actual audition itself. A final reflection and rubric are provided for use at the end of this unit.

A short play is included that can be used as the source material. You can also choose your own play for this process.

Standards Addressed

Unit Overview
The unit overview provides the objectives for the unit, as well as a list of lessons and materials including assessment tools and sample monologues.
1: Introduction to the Audition Process
In order to partake in the audition process, students need to identify and comprehend the necessary steps in that process. What is the auditioning process? Why is it used? Is the process fair? Why or why not? The class ends with students playing director in the “Who Would You Cast?” Exercise.
2: The Acting Resume
An actor needs two documents when they audition for a role: a resume and a headshot. What should go on an acting resume and what should stay off of it? What is an auditioner looking for? Students will discuss the purpose of an acting resume, review a model, and reflect on the process. Students will use this template when they create a resume for their mock audition.
3: Becoming a Professional Actor: Headshots
While the Mock Audition does not require students to bring in a headshot, it is an essential document in the “real world” audition process. A good headshot will help a director remember an actor. A bad headshot can get an actor rejected before they step through the door. Students will complete exercises that respond to the question What makes a good headshot?
4: Audition Etiquette
Students will continue their journey toward the Mock Audition by exploring audition etiquette. How can an actor’s attitude and behaviour affect an audition?
5: Choosing a Monologue 1
Students will continue their journey toward the Mock Audition by exploring what goes into choosing an appropriate audition monologue.
Attachments
6: Choosing a Monologue 2
Students will continue their journey toward the Mock Audition by reading and choosing a monologue for their mock audition. Students will now have to think about the monologue they want to choose for the Mock Audition. You’ll have to decide what you’re going to provide for them as well - this unit includes 10 monologues you can give students as a packet, at this time. You could also use your own drama library, or require them to search online. Both of these options will require you to build more time into this unit.
Attachments
7: Monologue Prep 1
After students choose their monologues, the next step is to prepare. More often than not, students think that preparing means learning the lines and throwing in a few moves. When students do this in an audition, it shows. The character is one-dimensional and the movement looks out of place. You want to see three-dimensional characters. You want to see characters brought to life both physically and vocally. In this lesson, students are given time to practice their monologue and start working on the who, what, when, where, and why.
8: Monologue Prep 2
Students will continue their journey toward the Mock Audition by exploring what they can do to prepare their monologue. Once students have completed the Character Profile, have them complete the Physical Profile. This will solidify how the character stands, gestures, and moves.
9: Monologue Prep 3
Students will continue their journey toward the Mock Audition by exploring what they can do to prepare their monologue. The last profile students complete will be the Vocal Profile. This will solidify how the character communicates orally.
10: Monologue Prep 4
Students will continue their journey toward the Mock Audition by exploring what they can do to prepare their monologue. They will practice their monologue and talk about dealing with nerves. This is the final lesson before the Mock Audition - you will review the audition procedure with the class and students will sign up for their audition slot.
11: The Mock Audition
Today is the Mock Audition. In this lesson, you will play director and audition students for one of four roles in the play ‘Jealousy Jane.’ Use the Monologue Performance Rubric to assess their performance.
12: After the Audition
How did students feel about their audition? Did they get a part? What is their response if they didn’t? This wrap up lesson allows students to unpack their experience with this unit and participate in a final reflection. This is not a full class lesson.

Standards Addressed

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