Stage Management & Technical Theatre

177 Lesson Plans to help you effectively plan your workshops and classes

Areas and Elements of the Stage

by Karen Loftus

Students will identify and apply their knowledge of the areas and elements of the stage.

Assessment

by Karen Loftus

The production binder is the final assessment. A checklist and rubric is included.

Building Stage Flats

by Karen Loftus

Lumber is expensive, so just letting the students have a go at building a stage flat could get pricey. Why not let them “try it out” by constructing the cheapest flat they’ll ever make. This lesson plan guides students through the identification and construction of the various elements of a stage flat (both Hollywood and Broadway) using paper, drinking straws, and glue.

Building Stage Flats

by Karen Loftus

Students will be able to identify the various elements of a stage flat and comprehend the skills, process, and math required to construct a stage flat.
Attachments

Building Stage Flats

by Karen Loftus

Students will be able to identify the various elements of a stage flat and comprehend the skills, process, and math required to construct a stage flat.

Calling a Show

by Karen Loftus

Calling cues requires the ability to analyze, strategize, and problem solve. Calling cues becomes easier each time, but every show is different and presents new challenges. In this lesson, students practice the act of calling a show. What are the types of cues that can be used? How are they notated in a script?

Changes and Transitions

by Josh Hatt

Students discuss scene changes and transitions. How can a poorly rehearsed transition hinder a technically effective performance? They then apply this discussion to a Scene Assignment. Groups create a scene and must demonstrate a scene change within the scene.

Cheeks and Jaw

by Matt Webster

This lesson will focus on the cheeks and jawline. Students will work with a partner to examine the structures of the cheeks and jaw. Once students identify where the highlights and shadows are located in that portion of the face, they will use the appropriate makeup to enhance the highlights and shadows.
Attachments

Colour and Angles

by Josh Hatt

Students will explore how lighting can affect a scene through colour and angles. Questions include: What is mood? How do shadows affect a scene? Students are given a lighting assignment to apply colour and angles by drawing a simple light plot.

Common Types of Theatres & Stages

by Lindsay Price

Students review the three most common types of theatre stages used today: proscenium, thrust, and arena stages. Students create the audience for a specific type of stage in a warm-up, and then in groups, students work to stage a fairy tale using the three different theatre configurations.
Attachments

Common Types of Theatres & Stages

by Lindsay Price

Students review the three most common types of theatre stages used today: proscenium, thrust, and arena stages. Students participate in a types of stages warm-up and explore how to stage something on different types of stages.
Attachments

Company Positions and Tasks

by Karen Loftus

This document outlines all of the potential roles and tasks for students in The Production Classroom. It includes the tasks each student is to complete for their production binder, as well as their particular role during the performance of the show.

Complete Makeup Design on a Partner

by Matt Webster

This lesson will focus on completing an old age makeup design on a partner. Students will incorporate the previous lessons on the temple, forehead, cheeks, jaw, nose, lips, chin, nasolabial fold, and eyes as well as the one on wrinkles, stippling, and finishing into a complete, uniform old age makeup design on a partner.
Attachments

Complete Makeup Design on Self

by Matt Webster

This lesson will focus on students completing an old age makeup design on themselves. Students will incorporate the previous lessons on the temple, forehead, cheeks, jaw, nose, lips, chin, nasolabial fold, and eyes as well as the one on wrinkles, stippling, and finishing into a complete, uniform old age makeup design they apply to their own face.
Attachments

Costume and Scenic

by Karen Loftus

In this unit you’ll explore the elements created by scenic and costume designers as well as technical directors and costume shop managers to convey the designs and bring the final production to life.
Attachments

Costume Effectiveness

by Josh Hatt

Students give their research presentations from the previous class. They then discuss costume design and the impact of colour on costumes. How can colour communicate mood in a costume? Students complete a reflection on what they’ve learned so far.

Costume Sales Pitch Assignment

by Josh Hatt

Students are given a Costume Sales Pitch Assignment. They will work in pairs to pitch costumes for a Blank Scene in which they must articulate mood, setting, the characters, and costume colours.

Costume Sales Pitch Presentations

by Josh Hatt

Students are given time to prepare and then give their Costume Pitch Presentations. The emphasis is on the pairs demonstrating a knowledge of costume effectiveness.

Crafts of Technical Theatre

by Karen Loftus

Students will identify areas of technical theatre known as “crafts” and explore how the use of these crafts affects storytelling.

Creating Ambiance

by Holly Beardsley

To create ambiance is to define the feel, mood, and tone of a play. Light and sound can change ambiance drastically. A castle in dark shadows will look gloomy and mysterious, while a castle in bright light will appear magical. In this lesson, students will analyze the use of sound to create and change the ambiance of a production.

Culminating Activity

by Lindsay Price

Students design, create, and implement a solution for the famous “exit, pursued by a bear” stage direction from Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale.

Culminating Activity

by Lindsay Price

Students work together to come up with a solution for the famous “exit, pursued by a bear” stage direction from Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale through written response, drawing, and making a design element with materials found at home.
Attachments

Culminating Project

by Karen Loftus

In this culminating project, students are put into groups to create the stage management elements for a new “production” of Jabberwocky, the poem by Lewis Carroll.

Culminating Project

by Drama Teacher Academy

Students will identify skills of strong leadership in theatre management. They will employ leadership skills to create and accomplish project goals and objectives.
Attachments

Design - Line and Shape

by Karen Loftus

Design, it’s not just for Art class anymore! A way to help your drama students understand abstract concepts is to let them take them for a test drive. In this very basic exercise, students explore the design elements of line and shape using only a pencil and a sheet of paper.

Drafting - Part 1

by Karen Loftus

Students explore an element of scenic design and apply their knowledge in a drafting exercise. They will use this information when they create a ground plan as part of their scenic design.

Drafting - Part 2

by Karen Loftus

Students apply their knowledge by creating a ground plan.

Drafting: Part 1

by Karen Loftus

Students continue their exploration of scenic design by learning about and applying the concept of scale. Students will create a ground plan of their classroom.
Attachments

Drafting: Part 2

by Karen Loftus

Students continue their exploration of scenic design by taking the drawing they made for The Glass Menagerie and turning it into a ground plan.
Attachments

Emergency Lesson Plan: Low-Tech Design

by Lindsay Price

In this ELP, students will review a scene written in a specific genre: Victorian ghost story. They will have to create lighting and sound without any equipment, and a costume design without any period pieces. How can students use atmosphere, found lighting, and live sound to visualize the genre using low-tech options?

Emergency Lesson Plan: Set Design Masterclass

by Lindsay Price

In this ELP, students participate in an online masterclass on directing and complete a viewing quiz.

Exercise 2: Concept Creation

by Kerry Hishon

Students work in groups of 2 or 3 for this exercise on concept creation.
Attachments

Exercise 3: Found Lighting Sources

by Kerry Hishon

In this exercise, students are given the opportunity to explore different methods of creating lighting effects using items and resources found around them.

Exercise 4: Shadow Puppetry

by Kerry Hishon

In this exercise, students will create a short shadow puppetry scene behind a sheet that is backlit.

Exercise 5: Notating and Communicating Your Concept

by Kerry Hishon

This exercise takes the concept creation ideas explored in a previous exercise and has students notate their lighting plans on a script.

Eyes

by Matt Webster

This lesson will focus on the structure of the eyes. Students will work with a partner to examine the structures of the eyes. Once students identify where the highlights and shadows are located in that portion of the face, they will use the appropriate makeup to enhance the highlights and shadows.
Attachments

Final Submission

by Karen Loftus

Students hand in script notes, ground plan, and renderings. An assessment rubric is included, as well as ideas for unit reflection and an extra credit project.
Attachments

Gridding Project

by Karen Loftus

Students experiment with the scaling technique of gridding as a way to enlarge a smaller image and mimic the technique scenic painters use to create backdrops.

How to Create a Master Props List

by Kerry Hishon

The objective of this lesson is to put students in a theatre production role. Introduce the concept of a master props list to students: what it is, why it is useful, and how to create one.
Attachments

How to Create a Master Props List

by Karen Loftus

To put students in a theatre production role and introduce one of the tasks of a prop master: a master props list.

Introduction and Exercise 1

by Kerry Hishon

The exercises within this unit are meant for students to explore the concept of lighting for theatre without the need for extensive tech or even a theatrical lighting grid. Each exercise is meant to build upon the previous one, as students grow in their confidence with thinking about lighting in different ways.

Introduction to Costuming

by Josh Hatt

Students are introduced to costuming through a tableau exercise, discuss the role of costumes in a performance and the impact of colour in costumes. The lesson concludes with a costume research assignment.
Attachments

Introduction to Lighting

by Josh Hatt

Students are introduced to lighting through video demonstration, discuss the impact of lighting on a scene, address lighting safety and complete a vocabulary activity.
Attachments

Introduction to Makeup

by Josh Hatt

Students are introduced to makeup through video demonstration and discuss the impact of makeup in a performance. What is the role of makeup in an effective production? Resources are introduced along with the Makeup Code of Conduct. The lesson concludes with students conducting research on pictures for possible makeup designs.
Attachments

Introduction to Set Design

by Lea Marshall

This hyperdoc unit is designed for students to work through at their own pace. There are five levels that students work through independently: Level 1: The Introduction. Level 2: Dream Room Project. Level 3: Become a Design Expert - students learn more about colour theory, design elements such as line and shape, types of set design, and set pieces most often used in set design. Level 4: A Set Designer License Test which applies everything students have gone through thus far. Level 5: The culminating project which has students designing a set for a song, book or play.
Attachments

Introduction to Sound

by Josh Hatt

Students are introduced to sound through video demonstration, discuss the impact of sound on a scene, and complete a vocabulary activity.

Introduction to Staging

by Josh Hatt

Students are introduced to staging through video demonstration and discuss the role of staging in a performance. How does staging help to visualize a location? The lesson concludes with a Greek Myth Staging Activity.

LGBTQ+ Theatre Designers: Quote Reflection and Expression

by Drama Teacher Academy

Students will review quotes from LGBTQ+ theatre professionals in set design, lighting design, sound design, and costume design. They will write out their first impressions, reflect on the quote, and then create a theatrical design expression. The focus here is time management and self-management. How will students use their time to complete their tasks?

LGBTQ+ Theatre Designers: Study the Unknown

by Drama Teacher Academy

Students will choose a LGBTQ+ designer that is unknown to them and has not, as of this writing, worked on Broadway. The chosen designer has to have a website with visual examples of their work, a bio or about page, and a resume. Students will analyze the work of the designer using the Analysis Worksheet. They will then reflect on what they have learned. If you want to extend the length of the lesson, have students put together a brief presentation on their designer and share their findings with the class.
Attachments

Lighting and Sound

by Karen Loftus

The lighting and sound you use for The Production Classroom will depend on what resources are available to you. This unit will explore how your lighting and sound designers can prepare and execute their designs to help support the script of your show.
Attachments

Lighting Design

by Karen Loftus

To be able to demonstrate knowledge of lighting effectiveness.
Attachments

Lighting Effectiveness

by Josh Hatt

Students continue to work on their lighting assignment. They will rehearse their scenes, continue to discuss lighting effectiveness and reflect on their work in class.

Lighting Systems

by Karen Loftus

To demonstrate comprehension of how lighting systems work.

Line and Shape

by Karen Loftus

Students explore the design concepts of line and shape and how they can be used by a designer to affect an audience.
Attachments

Line and Shape

by Karen Loftus

Students explore the design concepts of line and shape and how they can be used by a designer to affect an audience.

Links for Design Expert Slideshows

by Lea Marshall

These links are only needed if you wish to edit the 'Design Expert' slideshows that are embedded within the main hyperdoc. They will prompt you to make a copy. You will need to redo those links on your own copy of the main hyperdoc before you share with your students.
Attachments

Liquid Latex Technique

by Josh Hatt

This is a completely optional day as it requires a material (liquid latex) that you wouldn’t normally have on hand. It gives you an opportunity to show students another facet of stage makeup, opening the door for ideas and projects that students can do within this mini unit. It also creates a great “buy- in” for students who have been reticent to the process thus far.
Attachments

Machine Dazzle: Room for Art

by Drama Teacher Academy

Students will start with pre-reading questions about costume design. They will then read an article about costume designer Machine Dazzle, who specifically identifies himself as an artist before a costume designer. Finally, students will apply what they have learned about Dazzle’s design philosophy in their own costume designs.

Makeup Application

by Josh Hatt

Students take everything they have learned, and complete their makeup designs on themselves.

Makeup Assignment

by Josh Hatt

In this class period, students must decide what makeup application they are going to strive for and determine what skills they need to make it happen.
Attachments

Makeup Design Plot

by Josh Hatt

Students work on their makeup design plot. They have this class period to complete their design on paper.

Makeup Skill Practice

by Josh Hatt

Students use this class to learn and practice any makeup skills they will require to complete their makeup design.

Marketing and Audience Experience

by Karen Loftus

This unit will explore a couple of the Business roles: (1) Marketing and (2) Front of House. As a reminder: Artistic jobs create ideas. The production jobs implement those ideas. And the business jobs provide the framework that allow those ideas to be shared.
Attachments

Nasolabial Fold

by Matt Webster

This lesson will focus on the nasolabial fold. Students will work with a partner to examine the structures of the nasolabial fold. Once students identify where the highlights and shadows are located in that portion of the face, they will use the appropriate makeup to enhance the highlights and shadows.
Attachments

Nose, Lips, and Chin

by Matt Webster

This lesson will focus on the nose, lips, and chin. Students will work with a partner to examine the structures of the nose, lips, and chin. Once students identify where the highlights and shadows are located in that portion of the face, they will use the appropriate makeup to enhance the highlights and shadows.
Attachments

Optional Video Exercise

by Kerry Hishon

Use this optional exercise to show students a video about the role of a lighting designer in a professional setting.

Paper Runway

by Karen Loftus

To learn and execute a skill associated with a tech theatre role.
Attachments

Paperwork and the Prompt Script

by Karen Loftus

One goal of a stage manager is to prepare all of the necessary information to ensure a successful production. For example: character/scene breakdown, prop list, light cues, schedules. In this lesson, students practice creating a number of documents which every stage manager keeps in their prompt script.
Attachments

Part 1: Introduction to a Theatrical Role: Costumer

by Drama Teacher Academy

A costume designer and a costumer are two different things. A costume designer creates pieces from the drawing board to the stage while a costumer pulls from already existing pieces to create fully realized characters. This means the approach is different. With costuming, there is no such thing as a perfect costume. But there are costumes that create the right atmosphere. In these lessons, students will be introduced to the role of the costumer.
Attachments

Part 1: The Costume Designer

by Karen Loftus

Students are exposed to research, concepts, and skill sets while they explore costume design and the role of the costume designer. They will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of costume effectiveness.
Attachments

Part 2: Lesson 1: Analyzing Your Show

by Drama Teacher Academy

In this lesson, students start the costuming process for a specific play through analysis. Then they will be assigned (or choose) the character they will design for, as well as a specific costume. They will be given time to answer some analysis questions for this specific character and costume. Students complete these analysis questions in advance of the next lesson.

Part 2: Lesson 2: Inspiration Collage

by Drama Teacher Academy

Students will take what they’ve learned so far to create a digital Inspiration Collage as a way to help them visualize the costume they will create.
Attachments

Part 2: Lesson 3: Measuring, and the Three Stitches

by Drama Teacher Academy

Students will learn how to set up the costume racks to prepare for costuming a show. Students will then learn how to take proper measurements by measuring each other. They will fill out a standard costume measurement form. Then, after instruction on how to do the three stitches that can help them to complete alterations, they will practice these stitches by creating a pincushion.
Attachments

Part 2: Lesson 4: Costume Workshop

by Drama Teacher Academy

In this lesson, students will learn some distressing techniques and complete a distressing activity. After this activity, students will start pulling items for their costume designs as indicated by their Inspiration Collages. Students will then prep for a design presentation and costume parade after a work period in the next class.

Part 2: Lesson 5: Design Presentations and Costume Parade

by Drama Teacher Academy

Students will show their Inspiration Collages, their costumes, and their slide decks. They will explain why they made their choices and how it reflects their understanding of the character and the play. Students will do as much as possible to realize their costumes, given the resources available and the time they’ve had to work on the project, and describe what they would do to complete their costumes.

Part 2: The Costumer

by Karen Loftus

Students are exposed to research, concepts, and skill sets while they explore the role of the costumer. They will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of costume effectiveness.
Attachments

Performance and Strike

by Karen Loftus

This cover the necessary procedures for each and every show, as well as what has to happen once your show is over. Checklists for setup and breakdown are included, as well as performance reports, strike plan and worksheets.

Pillow Construction

by Karen Loftus

To learn and execute a skill associated with a tech theatre role.

Pre-Knowledge

by Lindsay Price

Experience Tech Theatre: Students will explore how technical theatre affects storytelling.

Pre-Knowledge

by Lindsay Price

Students will identify areas of technical theatre and explore how the use of these crafts affects storytelling.
Attachments

Preparing for the First Rehearsal

by Karen Loftus

Along with paperwork, there are other tasks a stage manager must undertake to prepare for rehearsal. Students will perform tasks that a stage manager must carry out to prepare the rehearsal space and communicate with actors/crew.
Attachments

Preparing to Produce

by Karen Loftus

This unit marks the first step in the production process: identifying and understanding theatre company roles, identifying student skills for particular roles, and identifying production needs.
Attachments

Production Binder

by Karen Loftus

This lesson describes the production binder, including everything that should be included as well as how to organize.

Properties & Prop Design

by Karen Loftus

In this lesson, students will take what they learn about the different types of props and how props are created or acquired in order to apply it to a specific project. Using their critical thinking skills, they’ll have to invent, design, and create a science fiction style prop for a hypothetical show.

Properties and Prop Design

by Karen Loftus

Students understand what a property is and the various categories of props. Students explore how props are created and acquired.
Attachments

Properties and Prop Design

by Karen Loftus

Students demonstrate comprehension of what a property is, the various categories of props, and how props are created.

Props Challenges and How to Overcome Them

by Kerry Hishon

Props add so much to a production, but they can also be challenging to work with. From dealing with a huge list of props, to having trouble using props during rehearsal, to problems with broken, missing, or consumable props, students need to work together to problem solve when a props issue occurs. This is great practice for students working on productions, because props problems will inevitably crop up.

Props Challenges and How to Overcome Them

by Karen Loftus

To apply problem-solving skills with respect to props challenges.

Real World Applications: Dressers

by Lindsay Price

In this real world application lesson students view videos of a theatre profession, complete viewing quizzes, and hand in a Reflection.

Reflection

by Josh Hatt

Students watch the scenes from the previous class and reflect as a group on the process.

Reflection

by Josh Hatt

Students discuss the scenes from the previous class and reflect as a group on the process.

Reflection

by Josh Hatt

Students discuss the presentations from the previous class and reflect as a group on the process. They address the role of costumes and costume effectiveness in a scene.

Reflection

by Josh Hatt

Students discuss the scenes from the previous class and reflect as a group on the process. They then address how lighting, sound, costume and staging interact together to create a technically effective scene.

Reflection

by Josh Hatt

Students discuss and reflect on the process. What went well? What didn’t go so well?

Rehearsals Part One: Responsibilities

by Karen Loftus

In this lesson, students practice some of the rehearsal responsibilities of a stage manager such as keeping rehearsals running on time through proper communication, line notes, and completing a rehearsal report.
Attachments

Rehearsals Part Three: Final Preparations

by Karen Loftus

In this lesson, students will explore the final preparations stage managers perform before heading into performance, and they go through a scheduling exercise.
Attachments

Rehearsals Part Two: Tracking

by Karen Loftus

In this lesson, students practice some of the tracking tasks required of the stage manager in rehearsal: blocking, scene shifts, and props/costumes.
Attachments

Rendering

by Karen Loftus

Students continue their exploration of scenic design by creating a color rendering of their set design.
Attachments

Rendering

by Karen Loftus

Students explore an element of scenic design and apply their knowledge to create a rendering.

Research Project: Costume Construction - Stitch Lesson

by Karen Loftus

Students take what they’ve learned about a new stitch and demonstrate a way to teach it to others.

Research Project: Elements of Design

by Karen Loftus

Students will research and apply knowledge on the effect of colour.

Research Project: Greek Myth Sound Assignment

by Karen Loftus

To have students demonstrate an effective use of sound for a specific story.

Research Project: Lighting

by Karen Loftus

Students will dive deeper in their knowledge of specific lighting equipment and/or systems as a way to further their ability to use lighting as a tool of storytelling.

Research Project: Props

by Karen Loftus

To continue exploring elements of the role of prop master.

Research Project: Scenic Painting

by Karen Loftus

To continue exploring elements of painting techniques.

Research Project: What is Theatre Production?

by Karen Loftus

Students will research a tech theatre organization and apply their knowledge by creating a marketing brochure.

Running List Exercise

by Kerry Hishon

To learn the importance of an organized backstage – through discussion, solving issues through performance, and applying knowledge.

Same Show, Different Stages

by Kerry Hishon

The objective of this lesson is to introduce, compare, and contrast different types of theatrical performance venues/stages.

Scene Assignment: Presentation

by Josh Hatt

Students review what makes a scene technically effective. They are given time to rehearse and then present their scenes. The emphasis is on the groups demonstrating a knowledge of staging effectiveness.

Shop Safety

by Karen Loftus

Students will identify, comprehend, and demonstrate their knowledge of shop safety by creating a public safety announcement.

Sound Assignment

by Josh Hatt

Students continue to work on their sound assignment. They will rehearse their scenes, continue to discuss sound effectiveness and reflect on their work in class.

Sound Design

by Karen Loftus

To be able to demonstrate knowledge of sound effectiveness.

Sound Effectiveness

by Josh Hatt

Students will explore how sound can affect the mood of a scene. They are then given a sound assignment to apply sound and music to a blank scene using a specific format.

Stage Geography & Parts of a Theatre

by Lindsay Price

Students learn about stage geography and parts of a theatre. Students practice stage geography in a warm-up, and then participate in a group activity where they are given random stage geography positions and have to present a scene from those positions.
Attachments

Stage Management Calls Game

by Karen Loftus

It’s important for students to be aware of both onstage and offstage theatre roles. But applying stage management tasks to a classroom setting is not always easy to do. The Stage Management Calls Game gives students a practical way to hear and react to the various things a stage manager may say during a rehearsal or technical rehearsal.

Stage Management: Know the Details

by Anna Porter

Students will learn the details a stage manager must be aware of as well as how to communicate those details in a clear and productive way. Students analyze a work of art to find the visual details required for that “production” and create an organized list to communicate those details. Students then apply those skills to a written script as the stage manager.

Stage Managers in Rehearsal

by Karen Loftus

Stage Managers have numerous responsibilities in the production process. This lesson will focus in on the things a stage manager does prior to and during blocking rehearsal from preparing for rehearsal, to taking blocking notation, to communicating important notes to other members of the production.

Staging Effectiveness

by Josh Hatt

Students complete a Staging Vocabulary Activity. They are then given a setting description and have to draw a set based on the description. The point of the activity is not to excel in drawing but learning how to plan and translate a description into a physical setting.

Step by Step

by Karen Loftus

This lesson covers a general overview of The Production Classroom process. It includes pacing suggestions for each step as well as how to find the necessary documentation to complete each step.

Student Leadership - Stage and Production Management

by Karen Loftus

This unit will allow students to explore the responsibilities of the stage manager and production manager. It may help you determine who the best students are for these roles.
Attachments

Tech Rehearsal and Performance

by Josh Hatt

Students are given time for a tech rehearsal and then perform their scenes. The emphasis is on the groups demonstrating a knowledge of lighting effectiveness.

Tech Rehearsal and Performance

by Josh Hatt

Students are given time for a tech rehearsal and then perform their scenes. The emphasis is on the groups demonstrating a knowledge of sound effectiveness.

Technical Director and Tech Crews / Stage Manager and Running Crews

by Lindsay Price

Students are introduced to two groups of technical theatre roles and the people in charge of those groups: the technical director and tech crews and the stage manager and running crews. Students will take on the role of a stage manager and practice the calls a stage manager would use.
Attachments

Technical Rehearsals

by Karen Loftus

The stage manager is the guiding force behind a technical rehearsal. In this lesson we will go through a number of different technical rehearsals and how a stage manager uses their preparation to keep a technical rehearsal moving.

Technical Rehearsals

by Karen Loftus

A review of the various types and stages of technical rehearsals, as well as departmental responsibilities, daily procedures, and sample technical rehearsal schedule.

Technical Theatre Performance Challenge

by Kerry Hishon

Students will work in small groups to devise a one-minute long theatrical piece from a prompt. They will create a performance, create a prompt script, assign Stage Manager and Technical Operator roles, rehearse the piece, and perform it for the rest of the class. Depending on your time allowance, this lesson could be completed in one class using only items found in the classroom; or this lesson can be spread over four classes (one class to assign and plan, one class to rehearse, one class as a technical/dress rehearsal, and one class as a performance and discussion/reflection class).

Temple and Forehead

by Matt Webster

This lesson will focus on the forehead and temples. Students will work with a partner to examine the structures of the forehead and temples. Once students identify where the highlights and shadows are located in that portion of the face, they will use the appropriate makeup to enhance the highlights and shadows.
Attachments

Texture

by Matt Webster

Students explore the design concept of texture and how it can be used by a designer to affect an audience. They will also combine what they have learned thus far to create a dream room.
Attachments

Tharon Musser: Lighting Designer Pioneer

by Drama Teacher Academy

Students will start with pre-reading questions about lighting design. They will then read an article about prolific lighting designer Tharon Musser who revolutionized the field of lighting design. Finally, students will reflect on what they have learned.

The Audition Process

by Karen Loftus

This 3-part process includes preparation for auditions, initial auditions, and callbacks.

The Color Wheel

by Holly Beardsley

Students will apply the color wheel to an understanding of theme and mood in scenic design.
Attachments

The Director

by Drama Teacher Academy

Students will analyze the role of a director as well as practice communication skills that directors use to communicate with audiences, actors, and creative teams.
Attachments

The Effects of Colour

by Karen Loftus

Students continue to explore design through the effects of colour and apply their knowledge.

The Process

by Karen Loftus

Students continue their exploration of scenic design by designing the dream bedroom of their partner.
Attachments

The Producer

by Drama Teacher Academy

Students will analyze the role of a producer as well as collaborate with a group to choose a play to produce and hire a creative team for the imaginary production.
Attachments

The Rehearsal Process

by Karen Loftus

This process covers typical day procedures for rehearsal and documents students should be using daily during the rehearsal process.

The Run of a Show

by Karen Loftus

During the run of a show, whether it’s one night or a show that runs for years, the stage manager is in charge. In this lesson, students will complete a performance problem-solving exercise, tackle performance reports, and reflect on whether or not they’d make a good stage manager.
Attachments

The Scenic Design Process

by Karen Loftus

Students explore the process of scenic design so they: • Have a guided path for work that they might create. • Understand what information designers need in order to create.

The Script

by Karen Loftus

Students continue their exploration of scenic design by taking on the role of the set designer, talking to “the director,” and analyzing a set description for a play.
Attachments

The Stage Manager

by Drama Teacher Academy

Students will analyze the role of a stage manager as well as employ service skills to facilitate solutions to issues that a stage manager may face.
Attachments

The Technical Director

by Drama Teacher Academy

Students will analyze the role of a technical director. They will also explore safety standards within a technical theatre scene shop and construct a budget for an imaginary production.
Attachments

Theatre Hierarchy

by Lindsay Price

This lesson introduces students to the various roles in the theatre and how they make up a hierarchy. Students take on the role of one of these three important roles in a theatre production through an activity.
Attachments

Theatre Hierarchy

by Lindsay Price

This lesson introduces students to the various roles in the theatre and how they make up a hierarchy. Students take on the role of one of these three important roles in a theatre production through an activity.
Attachments

Troubleshooting

by Karen Loftus

The Production Classroom has its challenges. The scenarios included are designed to help you to think about some potential barriers to having a successful production.

Types of Theatre Spaces

by Karen Loftus

Students will identify and apply knowledge of different types of theatre spaces.

Unit Project: Song in a Box

by Matt Webster

Applying the concepts and skills they have acquired in this unit, students will analyze, design, then build a single, comprehensive miniature set inside of a shoebox (based on a song of their choosing).
Attachments

Unit Reflection & Rubric

by Kerry Hishon

A reflection and rubric is included for final assessment of the work completed in this unit.

Utilizing the Script

by Karen Loftus

Students analyze a script to determine scenic needs. They utilize thumbnail sketches to explore potential designs for a play.

Virtual Scene/Set Shop

by Karen Loftus

Students identify tools used in a set/scene shop and understand their functions. They explore the tools by creating a virtual set/scene shop using traditional classroom supplies.

What is a Stage Manager

by Karen Loftus

In this lesson students are introduced to the definition of a stage manager, learn what a stage management team may look like, and take on their first stage management tasks: reading the script and creating a props list.
Attachments

What is Scenic Design?

by Karen Loftus

Students begin their exploration of scene design by defining the role of the scenic designer, learning what kind of sets shows can have, and applying their knowledge with a practical exercise.
Attachments

What is Scenic Design?

by Karen Loftus

Students explore the effect scenic design can have on storytelling using designed environments from known TV shows and movies.

Who's Who in a Theatre Company

by Karen Loftus

Students will identify and understand the roles and responsibilities in a theatre company: artistic, production, and business.

Wrinkles, Stippling, and Finishing

by Matt Webster

This lesson will focus on the finishing and final looks of old age makeup, specifically wrinkles and stippling. Students will work with a partner to place these final effects on their partner’s face. Once students identify where to place these effects on the face, they will use the appropriate makeup to add these effects.
Attachments

Zombification of an Existing Story

by Matt Webster

Students will analyze a story/script and create the circumstances that turned the characters of the story into zombies.
Attachments
© Copyright 2015-2024 Theatrefolk